Library Search Results

Your search found :
and
Per Page:

Okanogan terrane docks against North American continent 100 million years ago.

About 100 million years ago, in the late Mesozoic Era, the Okanogan terrane (microcontinent) docks against the North American continent. This collision adds to the land mass of North America and exten...

Read More

Vashon glacier begins to melt and recede from Puget Sound region and Columbia Basin around 16,900 years ago.

About 16,900 years ago, the Vashon glacier begins to melt and recede from lands that will come to be known as the Puget Sound region and the Columbia Basin region. By 15,000 years ago, the glacier has...

Read More

Salmon colonize the Puget lowland about 14,900 years ago.

Beginning about 14,900 years ago, salmon begin to colonize Puget Sound. During the last ice age, when a 3,000-foot-thick glacier moved out of Canada and traveled as far south as Olympia, no salmon, or...

Read More

Modern plant communities in the Puget lowland begin to thrive around 7,000 years ago.

Beginning about 7,000 years ago, the climate become more like the modern era, relatively wetter and cooler than in the previous 3,000 years. With this change the ecosystems of the Puget lowland began ...

Read More

Osceola Mudflow from Mount Rainier inundates the White River Valley approximately 5,600 years ago.

Approximately 5,600 years ago, a massive landslide removes .7 cubic miles of earth from the summit of Mount Rainier. The ensuing mudflow, which spreads as far as modern-day Kent, is called the Osceola...

Read More

Landslide blocks the Columbia River in about 1450.

In about 1450, an immense landslide tumbles off Table Mountain in Skamania County and completely blocks the Columbia River, shoving it a mile off course. A lake forms behind the dam extending as far a...

Read More

Earthquake of enormous magnitude hits the Pacific Northwest coast on January 26, 1700.

On January 26, 1700, at about 9:00 p.m. Pacific Standard Time a gigantic earthquake occurs 60 to 70 miles off the Pacific Northwest coast. The quake violently shakes the ground for three to five minut...

Read More

European horses arrive on the Columbia plateau in the early 1700s.

In the early 1700s, European horses arrive on the Columbian plateau, having moved north through tribal trade networks from Pueblo villages located in present-day New Mexico. The Plateau tribes, who fo...

Read More

Tlehonnipts (those who drift ashore) become first European residents of Northwest lands near Satsop Spit (mouth of the Columbia) in about 1725.

In about 1725, Clatsops discover shipwrecked sailors whom they call Tlehonnipts (those who drift ashore) on a beach near Satsop Spit, which was located on the southern (Oregon) side of the mouth of th...

Read More

Juan Perez and his crew on Spanish ship Santiago sight and name Mount Olympus on August 11, 1774.

On August 11, 1774, Spanish explorers on the ship Santiago, commanded by Juan Perez, sail past the future state of Washington, sight the peak that will later be named Mount Olympus, and name it "Cerro...

Read More

Bruno de Hezeta (Heceta) party lands on future Washington coast and claims the Pacific Northwest for Spain on July 12, 1775.

On July 12, 1775, Bruno de Hezeta, Juan Perez, and others from the Spanish ship Santiago land on the shore of a wide bay and claim Nueva Galicia (the Pacific Northwest) for Spain. This is the first Eu...

Read More

Smallpox epidemic ravages Native Americans on the northwest coast of North America in the 1770s.

During the 1770s, smallpox (variola major) eradicates at least 30 percent of the native population on the Northwest coast of North America, including numerous members of Puget Sound tribes. This appar...

Read More

Continental Congress of the 13 British colonies (future United States of America) passes the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776.

On July 4, 1776, Britain's 13 American colonies, governed by England through the Continental Congress, pass the Declaration of Independence. This founding document of the United States of America, dra...

Read More

British explorer Captain James Cook names Cape Flattery on March 22, 1778.

On March 22, 1778, Captain James Cook (1728-1779) names Cape Flattery. The Cape, home to the Makah Indians, and now part of the Makah Reservation, is the northwesternmost point in the continental Unit...

Read More

English fur trader John Meares names Cape Disappointment on July 6, 1788.

On July 6, 1788, English fur trader John Meares (1756?-1809) names the northern side of the entrance to the Columbia River, Cape Disappointment. The name reflects Meares' chagrin at not finding the Co...

Read More

Spain and Great Britain sign the Nootka Convention on October 28, 1790.

On October 28, 1790, Spain and Great Britain sign the Nootka Convention, which ends Spanish claims to a monopoly of settlement and trade in the Pacific Northwest. Nootka Sound, an inlet of the sea on ...

Read More

Captains Robert Gray and George Vancouver meet off the Washington coast on April 28 or 29, 1792.

On April 28 (or 29), 1792, two of the first non-Indian navigators to explore significant parts of what is now Washington meet on the high seas off Cape Flattery, just south of the entrance to the Stra...

Read More

Mexican and Spanish settlers complete Neah Bay settlement in May 1792.

In May 1792, Mexican and Spanish settlers commanded by Salvador Fidalgo complete a settlement at Neah Bay near the northeastern tip of the Olympic Peninsula. Explorer Manuel Quimper had claimed the ba...

Read More

Captain Robert Gray enters Grays Harbor on May 7, 1792.

On May 7, 1792, American fur trader Robert Gray (1755-1806) enters Grays Harbor, a large natural harbor on the Pacific coast south of the Olympic Peninsula in present-day Grays Harbor County. Gray, on...

Read More

Captain George Vancouver names Port Townsend on May 8, 1792.

On May 8, 1792, British Royal Navy Captain George Vancouver (1757-1798) names an extensive bay at the northeast corner of the Olympic Peninsula for the Marquis of Townshend, a British general. The "h"...

Read More

Captain Robert Gray becomes the first non-Indian navigator to enter the Columbia River, which he later names, on May 11, 1792.

On May 11, 1792, American fur trader Robert Gray (1755-1806) enters the major river of the Pacific Northwest in his ship the Columbia Rediviva. Indian peoples have lived and navigated along Wimahl ("B...

Read More

Captain Robert Gray explores Grays Bay and charts the mouth of Grays River in May 1792.

Around May 14 through 17, 1792, American fur trader Robert Gray (1755-1806) explores Grays Bay on the Columbia River shore of present-day Wahkiakum County, and charts the outlet of Grays River where i...

Read More

George Vancouver begins British survey of Puget Sound on May 19, 1792.

On May 19, 1792, the British sloop-of-war Discovery drops anchor between Bainbridge and Blake islands. The following morning, Capt. George Vancouver (1757-1798) dispatches Lt. Peter Puget and Master J...

Read More

Captain George Vancouver drops anchor off Elliott Point (future Mukilteo) at midnight on May 30, 1792.

At midnight on May 30, 1792, British explorer George Vancouver (1758-1798), sailing on the Discovery, drops anchor at Elliott Point, the site of present-day Mukilteo. The following morning crew member...

Read More